zondag

Antique canes - walking sticks, sold by Delta 98 Den Haag

 recently sold by Delta 98 Den Haag, The Hague, The Netherlands:

an antique 19th Century walking stick / cane

extremely rare, because made of terrazzo,

a technique of very small pieces of marble or stone set into a binding mixture


for this object the mixture is placed around a metal rod,

the top handle is formed as a horse hoof, the length circa 95cm


a dandy's accessory:


a 19th Century walking stick / cane, fully handcarved,

the top handle as a sweet dog's head with glass eyes, length circa 108cm

dinsdag

Antique turquoise, petrol, blue-green, green-blue, Bristol green white wine glasses from Delta 98 Den Haag

How delightful it can be: 

drinking wine from 160-260 year old glasses


How beautiful they are: 

18th and 19th century white wine glasses 

in the color ranges of

turquoise, petrol, bluish green, greenish blue, sometimes called Bristol green


all sold by or available at

Delta 98 Den Haag, The Hague, The Netherlands -






zondag

a double handed sword, the Two Handed Flammard, sold by Delta 98 Den Haag

 


a huge, more than 5 feet long, antique, forged iron sword with waved blade, known as: 

Two-Handed Flammard 

a specialized and effective infantry weapon, to be used during a fight amoung pike-squares in the 16th and 17th Century 

other names: two-handed great sword, wave-bladed two-handed sword, flame sword, flambard, Zweihander Flammenschwert, espee a deux mains, spada da due mani, double-hander, Dopplehander, Bidenhander, both-hander, slaughtersword, Schlachterschwert, claymore, claidheamh-more, the name Flammberg is said to be inaccurate. 


Flammard swords were developed during the European Renaissance (1500-1600), most being one-handed weapons. They were lightweight rapiers that could be carried around at all times by normal infantrymen and bodyguards. At the same time, however, some double-handed flammards were also built. These much-larger versions, with their undulating blades, were terrifying, capable of killing several opponents with one mighty swing. Only specially trained, extra-strong soldiers could wield a double-handed flammard – and they were usually mercenaries who asked for double the money for their extra power. These soldiers were called Landesknechte or Doppelsoldners 

This sword is made of a very high quality iron and has a forgers - black smith's - makers mark, partial indistinct, but the first letter is an N and the last letter an M, and is believed to be of German origin and made before, at least, 1750

provenance: found by Mr. C. Stahlecker and Mr. M. Eerland in 1940 under a wooden floor of a demolished house in The Hague, The Netherlands, after bombardements in May 1940, known as De Slag om Den Haag or De Slag om de Residentie - The Battle for The Hague, a few months later the German occupier claimed all metal, including iron. Stahlecker and Eerland hid the sword again. After Worldwar II they retrieved it and it was kept in the Eerland family since.